Tag Archives: nabe

Japanese food Recipes Travel eats

Kiritampo nabe

Kiritampo nabe
Kiritampo nabe

I love surprise parcels, especially those involving food! So when we received such a parcel from my sister-in-law, I was ecstatic; she had sent us a set for making kiritampo nabe, a type of hot pot from Akita prefecture in Japan, complete will the soup base, raw hinai-jidori (free-range chicken from Akita that is famous all around the country) meat, vegetables, and of course, kiritampo.

Kiritampo is made from mushed-up cooked rice (if authentic, of the delicious Akita komachi variety, of course!) wrapped around a cedar stick and toasted. It can then be slid off the stick to be used in nabe. The set also included damako mochi, which is similar to kiritampo, but instead of cylinders, the mashed rice is formed into balls about 2 cm in diameter.

Kiritampo nabe set
Kiritampo nabe set- ingredients all included!

The soup base was included in the set, but since this nabe set is not available everywhere, I will describe the recipe for making the soup base from scratch, as well as the ingredients used in kiritampo nabe. As with all nabe, there is no strict rule for the amounts of ingredients that must be used, but here is a guideline that can be changed according to the ingredients on hand, and personal tastes.

Ingredients:
200 g raw boneless chicken meat
1 leek
1 carrot
200 g maitake (Grifola frondosa or hen-of-the-wood mushrooms)
1 burdock root, peeled and sliced
1 bunch seri (Japanese parsley/dropwort greens)
400 g shirataki noodles
Kiritanpo (about 2/person)
Damako mochi

For making the soup:
1.5 L chicken stock or water
50 ml soy sauce
75 ml mirin
Salt (approx. 1 tsp or as needed)

– add the burdock root and chicken to the water/soup stock in a pot and bring to a boil
– add the soy sauce, mirin and salt, and allow to boil
– add the maitake, carrot and shirataki, then simmer for about five minutes
– add the leek, kiritampo and damako mochi, and simmer for several more minutes
– place seri on the top and allow to cook for a minute
– serve hot!

Kiritampo nabe and rice
Kiritampo nabe and rice
Pin It
Fusion Healthy cooking Japanese food Recipes Tools and kitchenware

Tajine nabe

Tajine pot

Tajine nabe seems to be very popular in Japan now, with frequent appearances on TV and in special displays in stores. There are constantly new recipes popping up here and there, iand t is hard to miss the craze.

You would be led to think that Tajine pots were invented in Japan with the way they are promoted here with large signs saying “Made in Japan”, and pictures of Japanese ingredients floating around them. In fact, Tajine pots originated in Morocan cuisine, and are used to simmer dishes and stews of meat, beans, and vegetables.

The Japanese version of the tajine is used mainly for steaming foods. It is heralded as a new healthy way of cooking in which foods are steamed in very little water, and so they retain more of their vitamins and nutrients. And of course, oil is not needed. The food is often cooked with only a little salt or soy sauce for flavour, and when eaten, can be topped off or dipped in a sauce, such as ponzu, soy sauce or sesame sauce.

Cooking Tajine nabe is an easy process. Simply arrange the desired vegetables and meats on the base, add salt or sauces if desired, add a little bit of water, close lid, and heat on the stove until steam comes out of the pot, and ingredients are cooked to desired consistency.

Mushroom, carrot, fried tofu (atsuage), and slices of bacon (before/after cooking)

Cabbage layered with bacon, and carrots with meat balls (before/after cooking)

Some popular ingredient include:
Cabbage with bacon slices slitted between leaves
Eggplant slices layered with minced meat
Lotus root (renkon) slices layered with a minced meat mixture
Mushrooms, leek, bean sprouts, garlic, and slices of pork

Slices of eggplant layered with garlic miso